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  • Behavior Problems? We have answers.

    Behavior Problems? We have answers.

    Learn about behavior from our team of experts. Whether you have cats, dogs, reptiles, horses or birds, we can help you learn to live with them. Read More
  • All About Horses

    All About Horses

    Learn about equine science, whether you're an aspiring rider or a long-time owner, we have the latest in products, breeds, and more. Read More
  • Traveling with Pets

    Traveling with Pets

    Be sure to check this section out before you hit the road with your pet! We've got a look at pet-friendly hotels, the guidelines of air, train, bus and auto travel, and much more. Read More
  • All About Critters

    All About Critters

    Take a look at what it means to have ferrets, rabbits, mice, rats, guinea pigs, and more. Read More
  • All About Reptiles

    All About Reptiles

    A look at our cold-blooded friends and discovering how to care for these fun loving creatures! Read More
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  • Alternative Therapies to Ease Pet's Arthritis

    Arthritic pain can be as crippling to our pets as it is to their owners, particularly in the dead of winter. If you've noticed your dog or cat moving a little slower these days, they may have arthritis, also called degenerative joint disease (DJD). The ailment is common in older, as well as long-backed dogs and cats. While there are a number of ways this disease can be treated, a combination of prescription medication and natural methods are often considered most effective.

    Read More
  • PETS Act of 2006: Understanding your pets rights in a disaster

    understanding the pets act of2006 The PETS Act of 2006 was passed to help evacuating owners and pets together. It's a good start - helping to ensure that people can take their pets along with them during evacuation due to a disaster. But, its effectiveness relies largely on your state and their wilingness to make accommodations for pets. It's just not as inclusive as we'd like to see it be. 

    For instance, prvate and public shelters can still deny your pets entry. Hotels can still deny entry. In fact, all that the Act really accomplish was to give states incentive (in the form of funding) to accommodate pets.

    This means, FEMA or the State may choose to build extra pet-friendly shelters. It also requires them to include pets in emergency planning, for instance in federal evacuation on buses, pets should now be allowed. There are a few things they should do if they choose, and if they do, they can apply for DHS funds. If they don't, no funding.  

    Read More
  • Learning to Live with Bobcats

    guide to understanding bobcats After posting our articles on Keeping Pets Safe from Coyotes, we began to get questions about living with other species of urban wildlife, so we're taking some time to discuss ways we can all live peacefully together. 

    As we discussed before, most predators are opportunistic and omnivorous - this means that like humans, coyotes and bobcats and other predators can survive on just about anything as long itis easy to access with a minimum amount of danger to the animal. This includes birds, reptiles, and yes - your small dog or cat. 

    We bring you the ultimate guide to humanely keep a bobcat from your yard. 

    Read More
  • Evacuating or Sheltering in Place with Pets in Disasters

    Evacuation with Pets

    The United States and others areas of the world have been faced with disasters everywhere. Massive wild fires are decimating Montana, Washington, Oregon, and California; the Southwest is recovering from deadly flooding due to Hurricane Harvey, and hurricane Irma is fast approaching Florida and the east coast with Jose and Katta are following on its heels. For that reason, we want to address a few questions we’ve gotten about evacuating with pets.

    There have been far too many cases of animals being turned away from shelter during these disasters. This leaves the owners to abandon or board their pets to enter shelter, or venture back into the storm with their pets. 

    Read More
  • K9 Honey is made for dogs (but you'll love it too!)

    K9 Honey: Raw honey gently blended with pollen from nine geographical regions

    • Naturally antiviral, antibiotic, antiseptic
    • Improves digestion, decreases digestive ailments and symptoms 
    • Helps improve healing time for wounds and burns 

    Retail: $10.99

    If you’ve never tried raw honey, it’s time to look into it for you and your pet. Raw honey is a fabulous, all-natural way to improve your pet’s digestion, alleviate skin and fur issues, decrease allergy symptoms, and help improve overall immunity. 

    Read More
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Dogs that can't Swim and Some that just aren't very good at it

Summer is officially here in the desert and we have reached temperatures in excess of 100 degrees, so you know Read More

Disaster preparedness with pets

September is National Animal Preparedness Month. Some natural disasters require that you evacuate your entire family, pets included. Wildfires, floods, Read More

Keeping Aquariums Alive During Summer Blackouts

Summer is on the way, and that means possible brown outs (power shortages) and even blackouts (power outages) for most Read More

Keeping Pets Safe from Coyotes

No matter where you live, you’ve likely had to deal with wildlife. Whether its mountain lions and coyotes, or squirrels Read More

5 Questions to Ask Before Getting Chickens

There is a lot of interest in chicken keeping these days. With the cost of food skyrocketing, chickens can be Read More

TrackR Uses Crowd GPS To Locate Your Pets

It's tough finding a GPS collar or tag that is small enough for your cat or tiny dog to wear, Read More
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Let's face it - bunnies are just adorable. I totally understand why someone would want to surprise their kids with a rabbit (especially during certain times of the year, like the fast-approaching Easter holiday). After all, their fur feels just as we would imagine clouds would feel – and that nose wiggle gets me every time. They suck us in with their cuteness, but the bottom line is that rabbits are a very serious addition to the family, and before taking the leap, one needs to consider the time and effort it will take to have a rabbit in their home just as they would if it were a cat or a dog.

Even the smallest bunny needs a lot of care, and we’re going to help you discover if you’re ready to have a bunny in your life. If you answer “no” to any of the following questions, you may need to stick to a toy bunny (like these – I want one!).

 

Rabbit Adoption Checklist

  • I am able and willing to (you, not your kids – we know how that works!):
  • Read up on rabbit care so that I’m fully informed before purchasing one.
  • Have my rabbit spayed or neutered.
  • Spend the money and take the time to purchase, prepare, and feed my rabbit a proper diet of quality rabbit pellets, fresh hay, and veggies.
  • Buy a quality cage for my rabbit to nest in.
  • Bunny-proof your home to protect your rabbit and your stuff.
  • Understand that chewing is not a bad thing for a rabbit; it’s how they keep their teeth trimmed.
  • Have a rabbit who doesn’t like to be held or cuddled.
  • Clean my rabbit’s cage as often as needed – even if that means every day.
  • Allow my rabbit a minimum of three hours a day of exercise time outside of his or her cage.
  • Take my rabbit to the vet for check-ups and emergency visits as needed.
  • Spend time hanging out with the rabbit on the floor to develop a bond and trust.
  • Care for a rabbit in my home for 8 to 12 years – the average life span of an indoor rabbit.

There is a lot more to bunny adoption than meets the eye. If this checklist hasn’t made you second-guess your desire for a pet rabbit, head on over to the House Rabbit Society which has a ton of great information on rabbit care. If after reading over that site you still want a rabbit, check out the nifty chews, toys, and other rabbit care products at The Busy Bunny. You’ll find some great items to help make your home a welcome place for your new rabbit.

Learn more about Rabbit Care:


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