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Rabbits make excellent pets for just about any home, but there are a few things you should ensure you're ready for before adopting. In this section, we discuss the pros and cons of bunny adoption, what type of diet they require, health concerns that you should consider, and how to make sure your home is "critter-proof". We also provide a Bunny Adoption Checklist so you that you can make sure you're ready.

There are several species of rabbits and not every one of them make great pets, so please take a look at our section on rabbits as well as our health section, which details the major health issues of these delicate little guys.

Bringing a bunny into your home is a big commitment that you shouldn't take lightly. With lifespans ranging from 7-12 years, it's important you're in it for the long haul. With proper care and lots of love, your bunny can be as affectionate as your dog and as entertaining as your cat.

Housing Your Rabbit

Your rabbit will need a large cage to live in when indoors, or a rabbit hutch to live in when he's outdoors. Rabbits can be very susceptible to weather, so you need to make sure they have the proper arrangements for any extreme weather (heat or cold).

Feeding Your Rabbit

Your rabbit’s diet should be made up of good quality pellets, fresh hay (timothy or other grass hays), oat hay, water and fresh vegetables. Rabbits also enjoy the occasional treat, but be wary of giving too many - rabbits can be overweight just like other pets!

Anything beyond that is a “treat” and should be given in limited quantities.

The age of your rabbit will also influence what he eats. There are very specific diets available for rabbits of all ages, so be sure you do your homework and find out which diet will be best.

Caring for Your Rabbit

Your rabbit will need regular annual veterinarian checkups. Some say that you need to trim your rabbit's teeth regularly, but if your pet has plenty of items to chew on and does not have any dental or malocclusion issues, you shouldn't need to do this.

If you believe your pet needs to have his teeth trimmed, it's best to let a professional handle it. Make an appointment with your veterinarian and they will happily take care of the trimming for you.

Grooming Your Rabbit

Grooming is important with rabbits, as they shed almost constantly. You should brush your rabbit at least once a week (more often if you have long-haired bunny). You should never bathe your rabbit. Baths are very stressful to these little guys and it's important to keep them calm. If you're brushing your rabbit as required, there should never be any need for them to have a bath.

You will need to clip their nails as they can become very sharp and may even cause injury to the rabbit itself. We will be discussing ways to do this safely and effectively, but please make sure you do it as needed.

Your Rabbit's Personality

Every rabbit's personality is different, but one thing you can be assured of is that they will chew anything and everything. This includes electrical cords, desks, chairs and even iPads. Be sure you have a safe environment for your rabbit to play in and you'll save yourself a lot of frustration!

 

Learn more about rabbits:

stacymantle
Author: stacymantle
About the Author

Stacy Mantle is a freelance writer who currently resides in the southwestern deserts of Arizona with a few dogs, several cats, and a very understanding husband. She is a regular contributor to Pet Age Magazine, Catster, Animal Behavior College, and of course, PetsWeekly. Many of her stories and articles have been translated into several languages, and now reach an international audience. She is also the author of a bestselling urban fantasy/thriller, Shepherd's Moon; a humor book entitled, Conquering the Food Chain: Living Amongst Animals (Without Becoming One), and a line of Educational Activity Books for children.


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