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Plants that Naturally Repel Fleas and Ticks E-mail

There’s been a lot of research done on plants that naturally repel fleas and ticks. Garden plants can be a great way to keep flea and tick invasions to a minimum, but you have to be cautious that what you plant is not something that will cause harm to pets or wildlife.

Beware of common toxic plants

Many of the common herbs used to repel fleas are also toxic to pets, including the popular “Flea Bane” (Pennyroyal). Other plants that have been used successfully to repel fleas are citronella, geranium, Eucalyptus, fleawort, wormwood, tansy and Sweet Bay. However, all of them are toxic to animals and should be avoided in the yard and garden. The good news is that there are many other options available for natural flea and tick control that are also safe for pets should they get into it. Here they are, in no particular order.


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Review of Healthy Horse Hors D’oeuvres E-mail

The owner of Healthy Horse Hors D’oeuvres sent me several of their delectable flavors to offer my herd.  I say delectable because these darn well smell good enough to eat! The ingredients are human grade, and there are no chemicals so I’d say you can probably try them.  Lucky horses get all the good stuff.

The flavors that arrived were: Oatmeal Raisin, Cranberry Spice, Carrot Cake, Ginger Snap, Cranberry Mint, Caramel Apple, and Blueberry Muffin.

First Impressions

So the first impression upon opening the package was the wonderful smell.  I made the mistake of putting the package close to the turnout while I grabbed my camera, and my OTTB was trying to open the package and sneak some.  Instantly upon opening I was mobbed by the whole herd.  They really wanted those cookies. 


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10 Ways to Avoid Bloat in Dogs E-mail

Binge eating is just as dangerous for our pets as it is for us. Gulping down food can result in a number of eating disorders and health problems for your pet including simple (but annoying problems) that include passing gas or burping. It also causes more serious problems such as bloat , torsion or Gastric Dilation-Volvulus (GDV).

Below is a very brief overview of the differences between bloat, torsion and GDV - followed by a very detailed overview of how you can stop your dog from wolfing his food and thereby reducing the risk of bloat. If you have a cat, check out this informative article about feeding your cats properly)

Bloat

Bloat is a very serious, often fatal disorder that occurs when your dog’s stomach fills with air, fluid or food. The food puts pressure on other organs, which causes difficulty breathing and reduces the blood supply to vital organs.


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Vetting Your Cat Veterinarian E-mail

You check the references of your physicians. You check the references of a person who does home repair. You want to know their experience, their background, who recommends them and why.

When I researched how much feline behavior veterinarians received in their DVM curricula, I was unhappily surprised.  Even in the best universities, most (few) classes were only possible for postgraduate work. You could get as much information on sugar gliders and goats as on cats’ mental and emotional life. Odd, that in a country where the most popular domestic pet is now the cat--and where more households have two cats, rather than one...

It’s your fur-baby. You want someone well-versed in feline behavior, as well as physiognomy, whether obtained through coursework or experience through personal interest.   This is about evaluating the practitioner, not the practice.


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Fencing Solutions to Keep Dogs Contained E-mail

If you have a dog, you know how difficult it can be to keep them on your property. Sometimes dogs just want to escape the confines of their yard, but it's our responsibility as guardians to ensure our pets are within our control at all times - even those times we're not physically with them. Fences make for good neighbors, and they make much safer environments for pets. Here are five ways you can fence your yard and the costs, the benefits and the dangers of each.

The type of fencing you ultimately select should be based on your geographical region, your HOA guidelines (if you have them), and the type of dog(s) you are containing. You'll also need to consider your weather. If you're in an area with lots of weather, you'll want to consider installing a more durable type of fencing. If you live in an area with snow, the snow can pile up near the gates and provide a near perfect way for your pets to escape. But, if you have a dog that is regularly escaping from your yard, consider reading this article or implementing some of these practical tips below:


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